Marketing Madness

Google Believes Just 1% of Publishers will be Impacted by Chrome’s New Ad Blocker

On February 15th, Google will be rolling out their new version of the Chrome browser, which will include an ad blocking feature. This, naturally, has caused a lot of worry for publishers and advertisers throughout many industries. Ad blocking technology has been getting a lot of attention over the past year, and if a sufficient number of people start using it, the results could be devastating to many who make a living thanks to ads.

Google has come out and said, however, that the ad blocking feature of Chrome will really only impact about 1% of total publishers. The browser is set up to block intrusive ads that aren’t in compliance with their standards.

Websites that use ads that don’t comply with their standards will be issued a warning, and given 30 days to fix the problem before they aren’t served ads anymore.

Leading up to the launch, Google has looked at more than 100,000 websites to determine how impactful this will be. The results found that .5% of sites would be at ‘warning level.’ Another .9% were flagged as failing to meet the quality requirements.

Scott Spencer, the director of product management for sustainable advertising at Google, said, “There’s a user experience issue online. If web experiences are annoying experiences, people will not want to search the web.” He went on to say, “We make money on search and good user experiences.”

This is going to provide some relief to publishers and brands that have been wondering just how invasive the new ad blocking would be. When the system rolls out on the 15th, it seems that there will be very little impact to the vast majority of publishers.

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Michael Levanduski

Michael Levanduski is the assistant editor of Performance Marketing Insider, and an experienced freelance writer. He writes content for a wide range of sites in virtually every niche, though he specializes in technical writing as well as creating content for the performance and internet marketing industry. Michael was born in Grand Rapids, MI where he still lives with his wife and three children.

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