New Report: Over Half of US Adults Make Purchases on SmartPhones

SmartPhones are pretty much standard in the hands of US adults, with the vast majority owing one. It is quite impressive how these single devices have replaced phones, cameras, video recorders, gaming devices, GPS’s, laptops, and many other things over the past several years. According to new data from Pew, it seems that SmartPhones may now be replacing the mall, supermarket, and other shopping centers too.

The latest e-Commerce report from Pew has found that more than half (51%) of all US adults have used their smartphone to make a purchase over the last year. This is a huge amount, especially when you consider that about 80% of US adults shop online at all. While most people don’t yet perform the majority of their shopping online, each passing year it is certainly moving in that direction.

Not surprisingly, shopping on a smart phone occurs much more often with younger people. Those who are 18-29 years old reported that 77% of them have made purchases on their smart phones. Only 17% of those 65 years old and older have done the same, which again, fits in with what most people would expect to see.

On top of the direct shopping online, about 59% of US adults use their smart phones to call or text someone to talk about a purchase before they make it. 45% use their phones to look up reviews or specific information about a product, and 45% attempt to find a better deal at another store before making a purchase.

About 15% of US adults say they make an online purchase once per week or more, but 28% said they do this ‘a few times a month’ which is quite impressive. When we really step back and think that this type of technology simply didn’t exist not so many years ago, it is amazing to see how people’s shopping changes so quickly.

Digital marketers can, of course, continue to capitalize on the trend of moving to a society that will eventually do the majority of all their shopping online, and likely on their phones. You can read the full report from Pew Research Center HERE.

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